Thoughts on the Class of 2017

I had the opportunity to speak to our 12th grade students and families the night before Commencement and then to give concluding remarks at the Commencement ceremony. Here are my remarks about Brimmer and May’s incredible graduate, the Class of 2017.

Senior Dinner Speech, June 1, 2017

I can still vividly remember the first night of US Camp with this group of 12th graders.large_news1111410_1042653 There we were sitting in a circle in the rec hall at Camp Wingate-Kirkland. My hope that evening was to just listen to them talk about themselves, their grade, and what made Brimmer unique. About ten minutes into that conversation- two incredible things happened. First, I realized that we should have recorded the entire conversation because the statements the students gave about what makes the school unique could have been used in Brimmer marketing materials for the next decade! Second, I knew from the way they described the school and each other that I would not regret coming to Brimmer.

Over the past few weeks, as I continued to reflect back on this class I kept thinking back to a theory one of my college professors, Presidential and American Historian Robert Dallek, shared with me. I would just ask you bear with me for a few moments as I dig into the idea a bit.

As many know in the early 20th century the United States was thought of as a melting pot. A place where people could come and cultures would mix. The concept being that everyone would influence each other and form a new norm for society. The problem with the model was that it was only a homogenous view of the world and didn’t celebrate or even recognize our diverse backgrounds. It assumed we all had to be the same. So, historians and sociologists began referring to America as a Salad Bowl instead. Showing that we each have our own cultures and identities, we are mixed together without losing who we are. Together as a whole we are greater. Dallek, my professor, predicted that sometime in the future the model would shift to a fruit salad. And I think that this perfectly describes our incredible class of graduates. Each of our students has their own distinct identities, personalities, and stories. They each bring their own unique flavor to our school. But over time, as they continue to work together, learn from each other, and challenge each other, some of their flavors start to get absorbed by other classmates. The cantaloupe begins to have some hints of honeydew and strawberry, the pineapple keeps some of its tartness, but also absorbs the sweetness of the watermelon, and even the grapes that seem impenetrable are coated with the ideas and experiences that help to shape what they have become in the fruit salad.

These 29 students are all incredible individuals with bright futures ahead of them, but they also have each shared a piece of themselves with every other member of the class and the school. They have enriched all of our lives by adding their unique flavor to each of us. And for that we will always be grateful.

I want to end with a short poem from Maya Angelou that seems fitting for this class and for them to keep in mind as they start the next phase of their journey:

Open your eyes to the beauty around you,

Open your mind

To the wonders of life,

Open your heart to those

Who love you,

And

Always be true

To yourself

Commencement Concluding Remarks, June 2, 2017

I present to you the Brimmer and May Class of 2017.

As we come to the conclusion of Commencement, I wanted to take one last moment to address the Class of 2017. During Convocation at the beginning of the year I shared with you the following:

“Our world needs young leaders who are actively working to make a difference. So, do not just sit back and be consumers of information. Be creators. Be active participants in the world and strive to make a difference- no matter how big or small. Some days you will take a risk and you will fail miserably. Other days those risks will pay-off. But in the moments of attempting something new and stretching yourself, you will be setting yourself up for future success”

Everything that we have heard today and all that you each have done over the past 2, 4, or 14 years at Brimmer and May is evidence that your futures are bright. 29 individuals with their own stories, passions, and strengths. Each one of them has grown from the risks they have taken at Brimmer and they each have helped shape our community. The Class of 2017 have individually and collectively pushed us to think differently about music, art, science, race, identity, and so much more. They are a group of people that simply do not accept the status quo and I want to thank you for imprint you have left on our school.

As I conclude, I want to leave you with one final thought. Golda Meir said: “Make the most of yourself by fanning the tiny, inner sparks of possibility into flames of achievement.” May your sparks of possibility never be extinguished so that one day we may see the billowing smoke from all that you achieved. Congratulations!

 

There’s a Reason for Those Citations!

Last weekend, I came across an article in the Boston Globe that called out to me as an educator: “BC cries foul after footage is used in video by Paul Ryan.” I could not help but start thinking about academic integrity, the work we need to do as educators, and the real world ramifications of claiming another person’s work as your own.

The article explains, in a nutshell, that Paul Ryan (and his staff) used video footage that did not belong to them. They took footage from a Boston College video production and used it without being granted permission. Why is this a big deal? Well, the Paul Ryan video likely violated copyright laws or another law that governs intellectual property. In addition, it is likely that highly accomplished and smart people will lose their job over this mistake.

The people working on Paul Ryan’s team are likely people that were very successful in their studies and worked very hard to earn a position with the Speaker of the House. So, how do we help our students avoid making a similar mistake?

For the most part, students are not making a malicious decision to take another person’s work and portray it as their own. Of course, there are times when a student is feeling the stress of a deadline or mounting work and may make a poor decision, but often students are unaware of their mistakes. This may come from choosing a source that should not be trusted, copying an image from the Internet, or relying too heavily on a google search. While access to information through Internet searches has countless benefits, it has also led to many complications and misunderstandings when it comes to intellectual property and plagiarism.

This is why we believe it is critical to teach students about curating sources, understanding how to tell what images or videos can be used, and how to go about gaining permission to use that media. Understanding “the why” behind properly giving credit to the authors of original ideas is a critical part of this learning and is supported by our Core Values of Respect and Responsibility. Our teachers and librarians play a crucial role in this process. Academic integrity is not about catching students, but is about informing them on best practices. As more and more content becomes accessible, this work becomes increasingly critical. We want to ensure that our students are informed and responsible curators of information so that they are not put in a position in college or the workforce like Paul Ryan and his staff.

Here are some helpful resources on Creative Commons, Copyright, and Fair Use from Brimmer’s Director of Middle and Upper School Library.

I Wish I Could Go Back to High School!

“I wish I had these classes in high school” is not an uncommon phrase to hear parents say after they have a chance to look through the Brimmer Curriculum Guide. The amountwow of coursework choice that Brimmer offers students far surpasses that of similar sized schools and is on par with schools that are four to five times bigger than Brimmer.

However, it is not just parents and students that are taking note of the incredible opportunities at Brimmer. Schools in New England are paying attention as well. Over the course of the school year, Brimmer has hosted professional development visits for multiple schools. School leaders feel it is important to visit our school because they see our focus on student choice and that we allow students to pursue their passions. They also see that our curriculum is focused on engaging students in real world studies and finding authentic ways to connect them globally. 

As a school that is committed to reflection and growth, we are constantly looking at our program and looking for ways to deepen the student experience. Over the past few years, we have seen the creation of Problem Solving Through Design, a course that merges art, technology, engineering, and entrepreneurship; Criminal Law; Women’s Studies; and International Relations. As we continue to look forward, we are excited about some of the new class opportunities for students next year. In the 2017-2018 Curriculum Guide, you will find new classes such as Latin American History, a new look for our Architecture and CAD classes, App Design, and Tech Shop–which will utilize our new space.

These new additions to our Upper School program, and our willingness to grow, are why we have become a resource for many schools as they look to improve their own programs. 

What classes are you most excited for?

2016 Favorites

Now that 2016 has come to a close I thought I would share a few of my favorite articles and
videos from the past year. I am sure that I have left things off that moved me, but here are the ones that rose to the top as I reflected on this past year.

Teach Girls Bravery, Not Perfection: In this Ted Talk, Reshma Saujani discusses how she came to create the organization Girls Who Code and the way to encourage more girls to enter STEM fields.

The Puzzle of MotivationDaniel Pink’s Ted Talk on redefining motivation is seven years old, but is still quite relevant in thinking about what motivates people. The extension that I find particularly interesting in how this may be extrapolated to what we do in schools and the monetary incentive parallels in education.

The Power of IntrovertsSusan Cain gives an impassioned talk about the struggles over introverts in today’s social world and the extraordinary talents and perspectives they bring to world.

Enabling Our Future: Cam’s 3D Printed Journey: Read about a family’s struggle to get a prosthetic for their child and how that was solved with 3D printing. The end result lead to a worldwide network of 3D printed prosthetics that are at a fraction the price to produce. While they may not be permanent replacements to other prosthetics it has freed thousands of people to get a prosthetic at a fraction of the price, built community, and is a shining example of social entrepreneurship.

Why Understanding These Four Mistakes Can Help Us LearnNot all mistakes are creating equal. This article discusses the values of different mistakes and what they offer teachers and learners.

Design Thinking/Human Centered Design

Design Thinking or Human Centered Design was a large focus of mine this year. Here are a couple of my go to resources:

Stanford d.School Virtual Crash Course: Experience everything that is Human Centered Design through this 90 minute crash course.

The Field Guide to Human Centered Design: A step by step guide that will introduce you to the process and purpose.

60 Minutes Visits IDEO: Hear from found of design firm IDEO on how they solve the world’s engineering and human problems.

Acumen+ Design Thinking Online Courses: Take one of these multi-week free online courses and you will enter the world of problem solving in a new way. These courses can both be a learning experience for you, as well as a way to make an immediate change to an organizational issue.

Core Values at Work

Every so often “Core Values” come up in the email subject line for students and faculty. I have to admit that these are some of my favorite emails, because they are evidence of Brimmer’s Core Values coming to life. Our school’s Core Values are rooted in creating a supportive community that creates a positive learning environment and upholds our school mission of developing lifelong learners that are informed, engaged, and ethical citizens and leaders in our diverse world.

Honesty, Kindness, Respect, and Responsibility are values that are instilled throughout the entire school. Students that began their Brimmer journey in the Lower School may have earned Gators for going above and beyond the Life Rules/Core Values and in Middle School they grew accustom to earning commendations for their actions.

In the Upper School students continue to live out the Core Values. Often a student turns in a lost phone or missing book. In class we see students using respectful language in class discussions and debates or taking responsibility for their mistakes. Our core values are evident every day in the classroom, hallways, and outside of school hours.

It can be difficult to balance the pressures of time and academics and often when pressed for time it can be difficult to choose to help someone and put your needs on hold. However, recently we had a “Core Values Alert” that is a prime example of the impact of character education.

As the Cross Country team came out for practice they noticed that a student and a few teachers were staring down at the gravel outside the gym searching for something. When one of the students asked what they were looking for, the team learned that someone had lost their earring. Just as the four or five people that had already been searching for a while were beginning to lose hope, the Cross Country team, without being asked, immediately spread out across the area to help find the lost earring. As the search continued, feelings that the item would never be found grew until one student exclaimed, “I found it!” They returned the quarter-inch long earring to its owner and everyone cheered over the success.

This is just one of the many extraordinary ways that the Brimmer community comes together to support each other. From small acts of kindness to larger efforts, our students are not just striving to be great in the classroom but to also develop into informed, engaged, and ethical citizens.