2016 Favorites

Now that 2016 has come to a close I thought I would share a few of my favorite articles and
videos from the past year. I am sure that I have left things off that moved me, but here are the ones that rose to the top as I reflected on this past year.

Teach Girls Bravery, Not Perfection: In this Ted Talk, Reshma Saujani discusses how she came to create the organization Girls Who Code and the way to encourage more girls to enter STEM fields.

The Puzzle of MotivationDaniel Pink’s Ted Talk on redefining motivation is seven years old, but is still quite relevant in thinking about what motivates people. The extension that I find particularly interesting in how this may be extrapolated to what we do in schools and the monetary incentive parallels in education.

The Power of IntrovertsSusan Cain gives an impassioned talk about the struggles over introverts in today’s social world and the extraordinary talents and perspectives they bring to world.

Enabling Our Future: Cam’s 3D Printed Journey: Read about a family’s struggle to get a prosthetic for their child and how that was solved with 3D printing. The end result lead to a worldwide network of 3D printed prosthetics that are at a fraction the price to produce. While they may not be permanent replacements to other prosthetics it has freed thousands of people to get a prosthetic at a fraction of the price, built community, and is a shining example of social entrepreneurship.

Why Understanding These Four Mistakes Can Help Us LearnNot all mistakes are creating equal. This article discusses the values of different mistakes and what they offer teachers and learners.

Design Thinking/Human Centered Design

Design Thinking or Human Centered Design was a large focus of mine this year. Here are a couple of my go to resources:

Stanford d.School Virtual Crash Course: Experience everything that is Human Centered Design through this 90 minute crash course.

The Field Guide to Human Centered Design: A step by step guide that will introduce you to the process and purpose.

60 Minutes Visits IDEO: Hear from found of design firm IDEO on how they solve the world’s engineering and human problems.

Acumen+ Design Thinking Online Courses: Take one of these multi-week free online courses and you will enter the world of problem solving in a new way. These courses can both be a learning experience for you, as well as a way to make an immediate change to an organizational issue.

Getting to the Root of the Problem

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In addition to teaching, I had the privilege to coach Varsity Soccer for ten years at Gann Academy. My experiences coaching soccer had a major impact on my development as an educator. It gave me an opportunity to think more deeply about such pedagogical concepts as differentiated instruction, self-paced learning, maximizing growth potential, balancing nurture and challenge, skill development, and project based learning.

One aspect of coaching that had a profound impact on me as an educator is in identifying the root of a breakdown in play, or in the classroom a misconception. Often we get entrenched in the mistake we see last. Personally, I started making this crossover as a soccer coach. In soccer, the last defender gets beat and a goal is scored. Yes, there was a breakdown in that immediate situation, but we often lose sight of what may have happened before to cause the defender to be in a more difficult scenario.

Transitioning to the classroom- a student asks a question that displays a clear misconception. Our immediate reaction should not be to answer the question, but rather to identify the source of the misconception. What aspect of the lesson did they not grasp or make an inaccurate inference? Did another student’s idea cause the misconception? This is where a true teaching moment occurs and allows us to think about our own practice.

I would often find myself asking: Is there a question I asked that may have lead the student astray? Were they exposed to this idea somewhere else? Is there a more effective way of setting up the activity to help guide the student? Are students developing incorrect analyses acceptable if it means they are developing their analytic thinking skills? Did the breakdown happen 10 seconds before, 10 minutes before, 10 days before? There is not always a deeper reason for a misconception, because sometimes a bad kick is just a bad kick. Yet these are all relevant questions that begin to surface as we think deeply about our practice and student misconceptions.

As educators continue to move down the path of becoming more coach-like in the classroom as facilitators, we are adapting our way of thinking about formative assessments and how we collect data to grow professionally.

In The Power of Teacher Teams, Vivian Troen(Brandeis) and Katherine Boles(Harvard Graduate School of Education) discuss how developing teacher teams to do co-observation and develop their skills of observation and evidence-based conversations on classroom learning can have a deep impact on how teachers think critically about their own practice. At Brimmer our teachers and students are not disturbed by other teachers coming into the room to observe a lesson. During the year we will be engaging in evidence-based conversations about classroom observations. Since we are a school that believes deeply in professional development and a growth-mindset, these conversations will help our educators continue to grow in their craft. They will help our educators look past the immediate question that was raised by a student and look for a deeper underlying learning misconception.